Author Archives: client

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What’s happening to the lake?

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Work is being undertaken to remove excess plant material from the main lake near Station Street and return it to full function.

Bats steal the night

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Lesser long-eared bats featured on our night stalk of 12 January 2013. Also seen on the night were lots of spiders, three species of native cockroaches, beetles and moths – including a spider eating its dinner.

Early Learning Centre helps the bush to grow

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The Friends of Queens Park Bushland received a donation from the East Cannington YMCA Early Learning Centre to help with revegetation activities. The staff and children at the centre handed the Friends a giant cheque that the children had decorated.

Let’s go cuckoo

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First there were cuckoos of the bird variety to be watching. Now there are cuckoo bees and cockoo wasps too.

Night stalk captivates participants

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Another successful night stalk on Friday, 23 November 2012, was held by the Friends of Queens Park Bushland. We saw a gecko, spiders, moths and much more.

Bushland grows tall without fire

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The bushland doesn’t need fire to grow well. The fire history of one area is shown by a 150 year old Balga that hasn’t been burnt for more than 80 years.

A walk with the birds.

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A bird watching walk was held through the Queens Park Regional Open Space for BirdLife Australia members. A very respectable 47 different species of bird was seen during the morning.

Happy 20th birthday Friends of Queens Park Bushland

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The Friends of Queens Park Bushland celebrated their 20th birthday with members and invited guests. It was also time to formally launch the website.

Wildflowers in the bush

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Wildflowers abound in the bushland during Spring. From the smallest to the largest flowers, they all have a role to play.

Birds start breeding

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Many birds start breeding in August. Keep your eyes open and you may be able to see the signs.

Planting season for 2012 is finished.

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More than 1,100 seedlings were propagated and planted by the group to help restore the bushland.

Millipedes are on the move

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Now that the conditions are moist the millipedes have started coming out and are walking around. There are at least two species of millipede in the bush – one native and one introduced.

Stormy weather takes its toll.

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The new habitat created by the storm of 10 June 2012 will help the whole ecosystem. Nesting hollows will be created and nutrients will be recycled, meaning more opportunities will be provided for every creature living in the bush.

Insect predators

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What’s the difference between dragonflies and damselflies?

Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos flock for a feed.

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Carnaby’s Cockatoo is a rare species of bird and needs large numbers of Banksia flowers and seeds on which to feed. The flock photographed contained close to 200 birds.

Moths are in the air

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The first new growth of the plants in Autumn signal moths to start the next generation of caterpillars.

Acacia stenoptera – a new plant species for the area

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A new flora species was found on 21 April 2012 – Acacia stenoptera. This brings out total of identified natives for the area to 205 species.

Look out for Banksia menziesii

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One of the most common trees in bushland across the Swan Coastal Plain is Banksia menziesii, Menzie’s Banksia. It is flowering now and will continue to do so until the end of winter. The flowers are usually red, but come in all shades from pure yellow to bronze. Both yellow and bronze forms can be found here, […]

Bats seen during nightstalk

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The night stalk held on 23 March 2012 brought us sightings of bats, silhouetted against the last light of the day. The evening then got better with sightings of a Western Bearded Dragon, two Geckos and moths galore.

Sand Scorpions come out at night

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Sand Scorpions, Urodacus novaehollandiae, are nocturnal and about 10cm long. They can be found in sandy soils in the Perth metropolitan area, and around the coast to Adelaide.

Trapdoor Spider

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A Trapdoor Spider burrow was found in the bush. With the lid closed you can barely tell it is there.

Summer flowers

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The bush is not dry and lifeless at the end of summer. With a bit of looking you’ll find that there are flowers everywhere.

Frogs make a splash on night stalk.

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Frogs were the last animal we expected to see when we met for a night stalk on January 27, 2012. But we must have encountered more than a dozen of them. Many more critters were seen that evening, too. Take a look at the gallery.

A new species of bird is added to the list.

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A very exciting discovery was made on 16 January 2012 – a male Splendid Fairy-wren was sighted in our bushland. To our knowledge, this is the first time that this bird has been seen in our bushland.

Insects galore

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While walking in the bush on 30 December 2011, we came across a grove of flowering Astartea scoparia. The flowers were alive with insects including Jewel Beetles.

Night stalk on 26 November 2011

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The FQPB held a night stalk on 26 November 2011. The light to attract moths and beetles was set up and left to do its work while we went searching for other critters.

Lesser Long-eared Bat

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Meaning of name: Unknown. Distribution: Occurs over all of Australia except the north-eastern coast of Queensland. Description: A medium-sized bat with a head and body length of approximately 45 millimetres. The back is light grey while the underside is paler, often white. This species has a wingspan of approximately 24 centimetres. Notes: This species commonly […]

Cat

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Meaning of name: The meaning of the name is not known. Distribution: Cats can be found throughout Australia. However, they are absent from many off-shore islands. Description: Cats can grow to have a body length over 60cm. Notes: Cats were introduced to Australia with the earliest non-Aboriginal explorers. Since then, cats have established themselves across the country. […]

Dog

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Meaning of name: Canis is Latin for dog; lupus means wolf and familiaris means of a household or domestic. Distribution: Dogs can be found throughout Australia and most of the world. Description: Dogs can grow to have a height at the shoulders of 106 centimetres. Notes: Dogs are permitted in the bushland but only while kept […]

Fox

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Meaning of name: Unknown. Distribution: Widespread across Australia. Description: The body is up to 74 centimetres long with a 45 centimetre long tail. The coat is a reddish-brown colour above and white below. Notes: The fox was deliberately introduced into Australia near Melbourne in the 1860s for sporting purposes. By 1917 it had reached Kalgoorlie in Western […]

House Mouse

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Meaning of name: Unknown. Distribution: Widespread across Australia. Description: The body is up to 95 millimetres long with a 95 millimetre long tail. Notes: The House Mouse was introduced into Australia. References: The Australian Museum Complete Book of Australian Mammals. Edited by Ronald Strahan.1983 Atlas of Living Australia https://bie.ala.org.au/species/urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:afd.taxon:107696b5-063c-4c09-a015-6edfdb6f4d52

Rabbit

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Meaning of name: Unknown. Distribution: Widespread across most of Australia. Absent from the wettest areas of northern Australia and deserts in dry years. Description: Rabbits have a body length up to 390 centimetres. Notes: Rabbits were introduced to southeastern Australia in 1858. In the following 60 years rabbits spread across the southern half of the continent. […]

Hoary-headed Grebe

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Meaning of name: Poliocephalus is from the Greek words polios, meaning grey, and cephalus, meaning head. Aboriginal name: Wyooda (why’oo’dar). Distribution: Most common in the south west and south east of Australia but are widespread. Description: Up to 30.5cm long with a 46cm wingspan. Notes: The furthest distance recorded by the Australian Bird and Bat […]

Australasian Grebe

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Meaning of name: The meaning of Tachybaptus is not known. Novaehollandiae means of New Holland – an old name for Australia. Aboriginal name: Ngoonan (n’oo’nan). Distribution: Widespread across Australia but absent from the drier areas. Description: Up to 25cm long with a wingspan of 39cm. Notes: The photographs for this species were not taken in the […]

Australian Pelican

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Meaning of name: Pelecanus is from the Greek word pelecan, meaning pelican. Conspicillatus is a Latin word meaning spectacled. Aboriginal name: Nerimba (ne’rim’bar). Distribution: Widespead around coastal and inland waters. Description: Up to 1.8m long with a 2.5m wingspan. Notes: The furthest distance recorded by the Australian Bird and Bat Banding Scheme for this species […]

Australasian Darter

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Meaning of name: Anhinga is the native Brazilian name of the bird. Novaehollandiae means that this bird is of New Holland. Aboriginal name: Mimal (mee’mal). Distribution: Occurs across Australia near water courses. Description: Up to 94cm long with a 120cm wingspan. Notes: The furthest distance recorded by the Australian Bird and Bat Banding Scheme for this […]

Little Pied Cormorant

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Meaning of name: Microcarbo is from the words micro, meaning small, and carbo, meaning cormorant. Melanoleucos is from the Greek words melas, meaning black, and leucos, meaning white. Aboriginal name: Kokoko (caw’caw’caw). Distribution: Occurs in Australia wherever water can be found, including ephemeral waters in deserts. Description: Up to 65cm long with a 90cm wingspan. Notes: […]

Great Cormorant

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Meaning of name: Phalacrocorax is from the Greek words phalacros, meaning bald, and corax, meaning crow or raven. Carbo is a Latin word for charcoal (black). Aboriginal name: Karbanga (car’bang’are). Distribution: Widespread across Australia but absent from the arid areas. Description: Up to 85cm long with a 150cm wingspan. Notes: The furthest distance recorded by […]

Little Black Cormorant

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Meaning of name: Phalacrocorax is from the Greek words phalacros, meaning bald, and corax, meaning crow or raven. Sulcirostris is from the Latin words sulcus, meaning furrow, and rostrum, meaning bill. Distribution: Widespread in Australia around coastal and inland waters. Description: Up to 65cm long with a 105cm wingspan. Notes: The furthest distance recorded by […]

White-necked Heron

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Meaning of name: Ardea is Latin for heron. Pacifica refers to the Pacific Ocean. Aboriginal name: Djilimilyan (chil’ee’mill’yawn). Distribution: Widespread across Australia but absent from the dry interior. Description: Up to 106cm long with a 160cm wingspan. Notes: The furthest distance recorded by the Australian Bird and Bat Banding Scheme for this species of bird […]

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