Author Archives: client

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Caterpillars – what good are they?

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Caterpillars have a bad reputation from eating the plants in our gardens. But what role do caterpillars have in the natural world?

Parasites are not all bad

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Not all parasites in the bush are bad. Parasitic plants provide food and shelter for many species of animal, but don’t ask too much from their hosts. We have identified four species of native parasitic plant in our bushland with the largest being the WA Christmas Tree. We think parasites are okay!

Boobooks: Dying for a mouse

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Boobooks are one of the most common night birds in suburbia. They can sometimes be heard making their distinctive boobook call at night. But the way we tackle our rodent problems has a direct impact on their fight for survival.

Native bees are making a buzz

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Native bees are making a buzz in the bushland during summer. A valuable part of the bushland, they are easily overlooked and dismissed. But the bushland wouldn’t survive without them.

Grass trees provide a feast for all.

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Grass trees are flowering and attracting attention from native insects. Take some time to look more closely and marvel at the hundreds of individual flowers that make up a flowering spike.

Reptile revival

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Reptiles are starting to be seen more often now that the weather is warming up. They are all harmless if left alone so look but don’t touch.

Orchids put on a fine show.

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August and September are perfect months for orchid hunting. Nearly 20 species can be found in our bushland. While you may not be able to find them all, some of them are easily spotted with little effort.

Bushland shows national colours

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Green and gold are Australia’s national colours for good reason. Many plants display yellow flowers against a backdrop of green foliage. Hibbertias are just one example of these plants.

Diverted stormwater adds new life

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Stormwater from a new housing development is being used to replenish the groundwater beneath the bushland.

Summer life in the bush

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There are plants in flower all year round in the bushland. The birds need a constant supply of nectar in order to live out their lives. Fortunately the native plants provide everything the birds need.

New bird species visits us.

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Crested Pigeons visited us in January – our 102nd bird species for the area.

European wasps are bad news.

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European wasps are bad news and need to be stopped before they take hold. Do your bit by becoming familiar with them and reporting all suspicious sightings.

Bugs suck!

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While all bugs are insects, not all insects are bugs. And while all bugs suck their food, not all sucking insects are bugs. Read on to learn more.

Paws for thought

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Kangaroo paws look lovely at this time of year. But they need our protection if we want them to be in the bushland in the future.

New bird species for our reserves

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We have seen our first tawny frogmouth in the reserves. Join us on a bird watching walk on 12 September to have a chance of seeing it too.

Planting season is here!

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We have seedlings in pots everywhere and we need to get them in the ground. Can you help? Contact us if you’d like to feel good while getting your hands dirty.

Banksias – beautiful and functional

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Banksia menziesii is the most common Banksia species in our bushland and it is flowering right now. Along with the other Banksias it helps ensure that nectar-feeding animals always have something to eat.

Spiders deserve a closer look.

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Spiders are all around us but largely not noticed. However, they come in an array of colours and body designs. Take a closer look the next time you see one and be amazed by what you see.

Damsels and dragons

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Damselflies and dragonflies are familiar insects. But do you realise how amazing they really are? Breathing water as a larvae, having 360 degree vision, able to catch prey on the wing and coming in so many different colours makes these insects worthy of admiration.

Whole lot of holes

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Many animals use burrows to lay their eggs, or spend their entire lives. Working out who lives in the different holes can be challenging but worth the effort.

Grey teal welcome next generation

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There are several sets of babies swimming on the lake at this time of year. Take your binoculars to see how many you can spot.

It’s not slime and it’s not mould

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Slime moulds are interesting organisms. They are smaller than the eye can see for most of their life cycle. But become visible and move around when reproducing.

A few clicks could earn us $1,000

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You can help the Friends of Queens Park Bushland earn $1,000 by voting for our cause. Bankwest have happy communities grants and winning one of these would make this section of the community very happy.

Creepy crawly cockroaches

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Cockroaches make many people cringe, but maybe they’re not as creepy as we think. They’re peace-loving animals that look after their babies.

Fungi are fantastic

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Fungi have started fruiting and can be seen all over the bushland. Leave dead wood on the ground where the fungi can return the nutrients to the ground and feed the living plants.

You eat and we win!

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Buy a burger at Grill’d Carousel and vote for us. Your vote will help us win $300. We’ll use that money to purchase seedlings, tools and equipment to help us look after the bushland.

Riffle causes ripples

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Riffles protect the ground from erosion and provide habitat while taking water from one lake to another.

What has eight legs?

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Harvestmen are arachnids, like spiders and scorpions, but are less familiar and far less commonly seen.

Nature’s larder

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Marri trees, Corymbia calophylla, are nature’s larder. With their flowers, seeds, leaves and wood, they provide something for every one of the animals in the bushland.

The jewels of the bush

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Jewel beetles abound in the bush, but you need a keen eye to spot them. Look for the adults on flowers during spring and summer.

Waders are breeding

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Just like in the movie, A Field of Dreams, if you build it they will come. And the waders did come after we opened up the edges of the lake. What’s more, they like it so much they’re having babies.

Feral bees are swarming

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Feral honeybees are swarming and taking over nest boxes. This reduces the opportunities for native birds and animals to breed and raise their own young.

Coots are breeding on the lake

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Eurasian Coot’s are breeding on the lake and in doing so are making themselves attractive to predators. Swamp Harriers patrol lakes and include coots as part of their diet.

Pink gladioli are flowering

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Spraying of bulbous weeds is starting in the bushland. The pretty flowers that started as garden plants have now turned into costly weeds after they were dumped in the bushland when no longer wanted.

Turtles are on the move

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Turtles are heading out to lay eggs and at risk of injury from vehicles, foxes and pets. Baby turtles are hatching and making their way to water. What can you do to help them?

Free guided wildflower walk

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We will be holding a free one hour guided walk through the bushland on 7 September 2013 to view the wildflowers. The walk should take about 1 hour but you are welcome to spend as much time exploring the area as you like.

Wildflowers are blooming

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The Friends of Queens Park Bushland are holding a guided walk on 7 September to show off the wildflowers in the bushland.

A few clicks could earn us $1,000

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You can help the Friends of Queens Park Bushland earn $1,000 by voting for our cause. Bankwest have happy communities grants and winning one of these would make this section of the community very happy.

Who’s been sleeping in my bed?

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Hundreds of bones and other body parts were found in the bottom of a nest box. What has been eaten and who left them behind?

Planting gets an early start

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An area of bush was revegetated with the help of the YMCA East Cannington Early Learning Centre. The Friends of Queens Park Bushland grew seedlings from seed collected in the area to ensure that only plants native to the area are used in revegetation projects.

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